Steam Greenlight Spotlight: Gridberd

Today’s Greenlight spotlight is on Gridberd, a first-person survival horror game by Wareberd. Gridberd is developed using Cryengine 3, which goes a long way to providing the very realistic and well-done visuals that you’ll notice in the trailer and the screenshots. As has been pointed out in the comments I’ve seen about the game, it looks a lot like P.T, which is a good thing considering that we can no longer look forward to Silent Hills. While survival horror games on Greenlight are often a dime a dozen, I have a feeling that Gridberd has a little something special that will allow it to stand out from the crowd and gain a respectable following.

The story of Gridberd begins when the protagonist, Sam, loses his memory and finds himself waking up in an unfamiliar basement. Sam finds himself face-to-face with the mansion’s owner, Kary, who was tragically murdered in his own office. After death, Kary’s spirit became determined to exact vengeance for his murder by killing anyone who had a connection to it.

The gameplay of Gridberd is standard horror, which has you exploring environments from a first-person perspective in order to find various information, clues, and secrets that will lead you to regaining your memory. As you learn more about not only the mansion, but yourself as well, you may be very shocked by the information that you find. It is said that eventually there will be a frightening conclusion to arrive at based on clues and story bits. Much like P.T., Gridberd features two different basic endings, as well as a secret and a “very” secret ending. This means that fans of the game will be able to play through the game multiple times in order to discover all of the endings and figure out what differences can be found in each.

Gridberd’s developers Wareberd are claiming that the game will take around 10 hours to complete a playthrough. This is definitely a large amount of time to spend in a horror game, so it will be interesting to see what they do to vary up the mechanics in order to keep the game fresh. One thing I’ve found with games such as Amnesia and Outlast is that, although they are very tense and scary at times, I often found myself so bored of the mechanics that it affected my immersion, which in turn made the scares lose a lot of their power. Hopefully Gridberd is able to create and hold a good sense of immersion while managing to provide an interesting and suspenseful story.

Finally, if you would like to have a look for yourself at Gridberd, you can find it over on Steam Greenlight. Be sure to leave some constructive feedback that the devs can use to improve the game, as well as a vote to help them make it through Greenlight and onto Steam.